Changes

If you and your spouse or ex-spouse agree to change the terms of a court order (Temporary Support Order, Final Decree, or any other), you must change it with another order. If your spouse says, “You don’t have to pay alimony for the next year if you will take the children to Disneyland this summer,” you must get it in writing and entered in court for it to be binding on your spouse and to protect you from contempt.

If you need to change child support or certain types of alimony, you can petition the court for a change. If you show a change of circumstances, then the court may modify these provisions. The changes of circumstances that most impress the court are those changes that you do not expect: “I lost my job because the company went bankrupt.” The courts are less sympathetic to “I just don’t want to work as hard as I used to work.”

Reviews from People Who Have Been There

  • I was in the best hands throughout the process.

    “Not only were they extremely prepared for court but they also ensured that I too was prepared for court.”

    Angie

  • Jessica Ferrante is quick and fierce in the courtroom.

    “Jessica Ferrante is quick and fierce in the courtroom. You definitely want her on your team. I recently hired her after a 3 year long child support case to get the job finally done. She not only got the case settled, but she won it by a landslide! I highly recommend her!”

    Abigail

  • I hope I never need a attorney, but if I do, I will only call Larry Rice.

    “He understood my difficult situation and was concerned about me as a person and not a pay check, and gave me wonderful advice.”

    Tony N.

  • They always made time for me and made me feel like a priority.

    “Larry Rice and Erin O’Dea are excellent attorneys.”

    Nancy

  • I am grateful that I had Larry to help me through that challenging period of my personal life.

    “Larry was so instrumental that the proceedings of my divorce did not harm my medical practice.”

    Former Client